Wish Recovery’s Blog Category

Mental Health

Alcohol Sabotages Sleep Hygiene and Prevents REM Rest

According to the Sleep Foundation, over 65 million people in the U.S. use alcohol as a sedative—due to its depressant drug classification. While alcohol can make a person drowsy, it does nothing beneficial for the quality of sleep a person has when sleeping after having a drink or two.

The Optimal Inpatient Experience: Treatment Designed for You

When you or a loved one finally come to the realization that a problem is more than a problem, and a habit has become a disorder it is time to take the next step and determine how, where, and by whom those issues can be treated.

Healing from Addiction with the Brain's Neuroplasticity

For decades, people thought that once the brain got damaged, it could not repair itself. However, scientists have found that the brain can regenerate neurons and form new connections in recent years. Researchers have also found out that if they can make old cells function better or produce new ones, they can slow down or even reverse many of the effects of aging on the brain.

Why can’t I stop drinking so much or using drugs?

If there were any truth to the misconception, some people have, that all anyone must do if they genuinely want to stop drinking or using drugs is to say, “No,” “I’m done,” “That’s it. I quit,” then, there wouldn’t be nearly 35 million people in the U.S. today diagnosed with a substance use or alcohol use disorder.

Understanding the Functioning Substance User

There’s a segment of people within our population who misuse drugs and alcohol but skillfully keep their usage covertly tucked away in the shadows. They have a seemingly successful public life with an excellent job, lovely home, sweet family, and pleasant social affairs. They are high-functioning substance users.

What are the Stages of Recovery?

The Six Stages of Change—popularized by the Transtheoretical Model developed in the late 70s—has become a measuring tool in behavioral health settings. It helps people embarking on intentional change. These self-changers use the stages to navigate through the process of addiction recovery.

A Brief History of the Word Addiction

The term "addiction" has historically had Latin roots, with translated meanings ranging from deity devotion to attachments to enslavement.

New Year Resolutions to Quit Drugs or Alcohol Aren’t Ideal

We all have different ideas about making resolutions at the start of the year. One of the most common resolutions, other than losing weight, is to quit smoking, drinking alcohol, or doing drugs. These are noble goals that can be hard to stay motivated to achieve without help.

Quitting drugs can be a complex process because the initial withdrawal symptoms may seem impossible without help from family members and friends or residential detox. Relapse could turn your resolution into remorse or regret. But there are different approaches you can take to make a lifestyle change to sober living.

ADHD and Substance Use Disorder: The Connection, The Challenges and the Solutions

Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a 3-4% prevalence in the general population. The condition often coexists with other clinical disorders. These other disturbances could include issues with anxiety, sleep, moods, personality, drugs or alcohol. Within the last decade, many researchers have examined the co-occurrence of ADHD and substance use problems. As with ADHD, substance use disorders (SUDs) have significant social, psychological and economic implications, making their proper treatment critical to a person’s ability to live a sustainable life. Adults with ADHD often have substance use disorders that involve nicotine, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine, to name a few.

What Does It Mean to Practice Self-Care in Recovery?

Sobriety is just one aspect of recovery. A new life awaits you if you stop using drugs or alcohol. Self-care is at the heart of a significant transition.
We all require a tune-up when we become clean since drug abuse has ravaged our health. Drug and alcohol abuse is harmful to the body, mind, and soul. Those with substance use disorders who have been inactive in their recovery treatment for months or years must take the necessary steps to rehabilitate and preserve their health.

How Does Self-Acceptance Relate to Addiction Recovery?

Many people will tell you that recovery from drugs and alcohol begins with recognizing and accepting that your drinking or substance abuse is a problem. While it is an essential first step, authentic healing begins more profoundly with self-acceptance.

To accept oneself—flaws and all is what it means to be truly human. Many people who begin using drugs or develop problematic drinking behaviors do so from silent psychological prompts of low self-esteem and self-worth, which are directly linked to a lack of self-acceptance and self-love.

Keeping Your Job While Going to Rehab: How to Balance Career With Recovery

Addiction to drugs or alcohol can have a profound, negative effect on a person’s ability to live a healthy, fulfilling life. Its consequences impact every aspect of a person’s well-being, from their physical and mental health to their safety and ability to have healthy relationships.

Use Judgment Diffusion in Recovery to Let Go

We all play the role of a judge at some point. Opinions are another word for judgments, which may be excellent or negative. "That was the worst pizza I've ever eaten." "That cake seems to be laden with calories." Today has been a wonderful day to be outside.

 

Judgments about your self-destructive conduct are common among those with drug misuse or addiction issues. Addictions and substance abuse can hurt people's daily lives and interactions with others, so it's normal and natural that people be concerned. You'll simply make yourself feel worse if you judge yourself for being unable to quit or continue using despite the repercussions and the opinions of others.

Coping with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

Co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders (SUDs) may be burdensome. If you have this problem, you know how tough it is to live a regular life. The National Center for Drug Abuse Statistics reports that 165 million Americans, or 60.2% of the population over 12, currently abuse drugs, including alcohol and cigarettes. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 8 million people, or 17.5% of those with mental health difficulties, abuse drugs. This article will discuss dual diagnosis, signs, and how to manage both conditions.

Why are Bipolar Disorder and Substance Use often Mentioned Together?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, people who have bipolar disorder are twice as likely to struggle with substance use disorder (SUD). Bipolar disorder and substance use disorder intersect at many levels for various people. Since having bipolar can lead to or worsen SUD symptoms, many people view the two as related.

When a person has a diagnosis of substance use disorder with bipolar, they have co-occurring disorders or dual diagnosis. Even though the term "dual diagnosis" is singular, people with co-occurring conditions must get integrated treatment for each illness for improved life quality.

Clear Mind Vs. Addiction Mind & Clean Mind

A clear mind is synthesized as the convergence point of a clean mind and an addiction mind. With a clear mind, you're sober, but you also recognize warnings and take precautions to avoid relapse.

 

To have a clean mind is to be sober and free from problematic addictive behavior for an extended time, yet to be utterly ignorant of the risks and desires associated with returning to it. Having a clean mind might make you feel like you can conquer your addiction and never give in to the urge to use substances or drink again. This is the fallacy of sobriety, in that there is the conviction that one is no longer affected by addiction.