Wish Recovery’s Blog Category

Alcohol Addiction

When Prescription Drug Use Becomes Abuse: How to Spot the Signs

Pain is a double-edged sword in that it is both dreaded and useful at the same time. On one hand, pain teaches us to avoid fire, sharp objects, poison, cliff edges and many other things that could do us harm. On the other, depending on the duration and intensity, it ranges from unpleasant to unbearable. 

The Optimal Inpatient Experience: Treatment Designed for You

When you or a loved one finally come to the realization that a problem is more than a problem, and a habit has become a disorder it is time to take the next step and determine how, where, and by whom those issues can be treated.

Using CBT for Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment

Entering an inpatient rehab facility for alcohol detox, prescription drug rehabilitation, or some other drug detox is an excellent first step taking you down the right path headed to your recovery. The road to abstinence isn't easy, but it isn't that hard with the proper support.

Understanding Dual Diagnosis

Understanding Dual Diagnosis, Co-Occurring Disorders, and Integrated Treatment

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reports that 8% of the United States' adult population has a mental health disorder. If you look at half of those people, they also live with a co-occurring substance use disorder (SUD) or addictive behavior.

Alcohol Sabotages Sleep Hygiene and Prevents REM Rest

According to the Sleep Foundation, over 65 million people in the U.S. use alcohol as a sedative—due to its depressant drug classification. While alcohol can make a person drowsy, it does nothing beneficial for the quality of sleep a person has when sleeping after having a drink or two.

The Optimal Inpatient Experience: Treatment Designed for You

When you or a loved one finally come to the realization that a problem is more than a problem, and a habit has become a disorder it is time to take the next step and determine how, where, and by whom those issues can be treated.

Medical Supervision for Alcohol Detox

Alcohol addiction is the most common form of substance abuse, afflicting an estimated 14.4 million American adults. Heavy or long-term alcohol use can lead to life-threatening diseases, and it affects productivity and relationships. 

Healing from Addiction with the Brain's Neuroplasticity

For decades, people thought that once the brain got damaged, it could not repair itself. However, scientists have found that the brain can regenerate neurons and form new connections in recent years. Researchers have also found out that if they can make old cells function better or produce new ones, they can slow down or even reverse many of the effects of aging on the brain.

Four Cognitive Distortions that Get in the Way of Recovery

It is not simple to recover from a substance use problem. It typically entails exercising self-control and avoiding individuals who might lure you back to substance use. However, one of the most challenging aspects of recovery is changing your way of thinking. Your ideas are an integral component of your substance use disorder (SUD). Negative thoughts can interfere with your healing.

The California Detox Difference

Detox, also known as withdrawal therapy, is the initial step for many individuals battling substance use disorders to manage their physical dependence on alcohol or drugs. It helps them improve comfortably before beginning a rehabilitation program. Even though Northern California has a few alternatives for inpatient or residential treatment, you’ll find most California treatment facilities in the southern part of the state. San Diego, Orange County, and Los Angeles are all now popular rehab locations.

Am I an Alcoholic If I Binge Drink?

Drinking alcohol is popular among many people. From daily use to only special occasions, from social to binging, they differ from moderate to unhealthy use. Binge drinking and drinking too much alcohol can raise the risks of developing alcohol use disorder (AUD). Conditions encompassed within an AUD diagnosis include those associated with alcohol addiction, alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.

Why can’t I stop drinking so much or using drugs?

If there were any truth to the misconception, some people have, that all anyone must do if they genuinely want to stop drinking or using drugs is to say, “No,” “I’m done,” “That’s it. I quit,” then, there wouldn’t be nearly 35 million people in the U.S. today diagnosed with a substance use or alcohol use disorder.

Understanding Substance Misuse, Abuse, Dependence and Addiction

Knowing the differences between the misuse and abuse of drugs or having a dependence on or an addiction to psychoactive substances like alcohol or pain relievers can help you communicate to others, particularly medical and mental health professionals, about your relationship with substances. These affiliated terms of substance use may seem to represent the same thing, and you'll find that some providers use a few of them interchangeably. But, if you want to understand the breadth of your relationship with psychotropic substances, the descriptions of these terms below may be informatively revealing.

Luxury Rehabs 101: A Guide to Everything You Need to Know About Private Luxury Rehab and Detox

Residential, resort-style luxury rehab is a kind of inpatient treatment for substance abuse. In addition to CBT, patients have several therapy options and may choose from various treatment regimens to address their mental health concerns. Most high-end addiction treatment centers offer a restricted number of beds and provide housing for individuals who must continue working.

Recovery and the Family

There is an adage in recovery circles regarding family therapy which says, “The patient is the family, and the family is the patient.”

Individual Therapy vs Group Therapy

A comprehensive recovery program will give patients access to a wide range of therapies and treatments. Group therapy and individual therapy are both integral components of any quality drug rehabilitation program. In this article, we’ll explore the differences between individual treatment and group treatment, the advantages and how both are critical to long term recovery. 

Treating Substance Use Disorder with Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

There are many treatment options available to help individuals with substance use disorder, SUD, and other addictive behavior problems. Many modalities, particularly behavioral therapies, have successfully helped people find their way down the recovery path from SUD. CBT has been a longstanding, go-to therapeutic choice for people with addictive behaviors.

How Do You Deal with Dual Diagnosis?

Dual diagnosis isn't itself a diagnosis, but it is a term that describes co-occurring conditions of a substance use disorder and mental illness.

What are the Stages of Recovery?

The Six Stages of Change—popularized by the Transtheoretical Model developed in the late 70s—has become a measuring tool in behavioral health settings. It helps people embarking on intentional change. These self-changers use the stages to navigate through the process of addiction recovery.

Basic Details about NAD + Treatment in Addiction Recovery

When a person has an addiction to drugs or alcohol, substances alter their brain functions. With continued substance use, one of the body’s most essential molecules gets depleted. The molecule is NAD+. Addiction recovery is not impossible but, it can be difficult. With the aid of NAD+ treatment, a relatively new holistic IV infusion that boosts natural amounts of NAD+, recovery is not only more of a possibility. It promises to make recovery more successful and sustainable.

Better Chances of No More AUD Symptoms After Treatment in Alcohol Rehab

It may be challenging to identify when drinking has gotten out of control, despite how obvious it is when it affects the most important aspects of life—relationships, money, mental stability, health and happiness. When is it appropriate to look for help? For rehabilitation that's even imaginable, you must first identify your problem. Friends, coworkers, or family members may bring up your issues, but only you can assess yourself.

4 Ways a Residential Rehab Can Help You Cope with Relapse

Because of the varying degrees of substance use disorders (SUDs), many individuals suffer from addiction and alcoholism, which are the most severe manifestations of SUDs. Even after treatment, ONLY 40 to 60% of people who try to stop drinking or using drugs succeed. For many people, it is practically inevitable. This reality can discourage some, but relapse prevention like what you'll receive at residential rehab can help you develop coping skills to avoid or deal with triggers to use more flexibly and productively. This adaptability makes the chances of preventing a relapse more significant, and you'll be less likely to return to previous behaviors and substance use once you leave inpatient treatment.

Here are four ways your stay at a residential rehab can help you cope with or avoid relapse along your recovery journey:

After Detox and Drug Rehab, How Do You Find Work?

You've completed your treatment at a luxury drug rehab facility, and now you're ready to look for work. Gainful employment can be a very satisfying experience. It's nice to earn a livelihood and take part in the workforce again. Here are some things to keep in mind.

The Deadly Truth About Drinking and Driving

Many people believe that it’s OK to drink and drive because they are responsible people. But the truth is, getting behind the wheel after drinking alcohol can have devastating consequences for those around you, as well as yourself. Drinking and driving can have severe impacts on not just your safety but also others—from minor injuries to severe injuries to fines to jail time to death. Too many people believe in the fallacy of immunity that it can’t happen to them. Even if you’ve never had an accident because of drunken driving, it doesn’t mean that you aren’t responsible for other people’s lives when you drink and drive.

Drug Use in Silicon Valley: Dysfunctional Fused Drug and Work Cultures

Silicon Valley is frequently associated with technology, the internet and riches. It is the birthplace of Facebook, Apple and Google. Peeling back the veil of technical progress reveals a culture of drugs and excess that all too frequently leads to drug addiction and overdose.

A Brief History of the Word Addiction

The term "addiction" has historically had Latin roots, with translated meanings ranging from deity devotion to attachments to enslavement.

7 Tips for Staying Sober During the Holidays

The holidays are a time of celebration, nostalgia and family traditions. However, these same festivities can trigger feelings of loss or sadness for some people, and it can be a time of increased risk for substance use, even if you’ve been sobered for some time. Substance use disorders impact about 20 million people in the United States. And more than half of these individuals live with one or more mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. It can be hard to know how to cope with your addiction during all the festivities and stress that come with this time of year. The good news is that there are ways you can do this without feeling overwhelmed. These five tips will help you stay on track with your recovery plan and maintain your sobriety throughout this time of year.

Coping With Relapse and Seasonal Affective Disorder During the Holidays

The start of Thanksgiving heralds the approach of the holiday season and the holiday or winter blues for many. While the beginning of the holiday season can be exciting for some, luminous lights, cheerful music, and an infectious sense of goodwill can cause dread, anxiety, and even depression in others. For these people, the holidays can be a real challenge for the holiday blues or, in more severe manifestations, seasonal affective disorder (SAD). SAD affects up to 20% of the U.S. population. As with other forms of depression, many people with SAD also have co-occurring substance use disorders, making the holiday blues even more disturbing and increasing the chances of relapse during this time of year.

New Year Resolutions to Quit Drugs or Alcohol Aren’t Ideal

We all have different ideas about making resolutions at the start of the year. One of the most common resolutions, other than losing weight, is to quit smoking, drinking alcohol, or doing drugs. These are noble goals that can be hard to stay motivated to achieve without help.

Quitting drugs can be a complex process because the initial withdrawal symptoms may seem impossible without help from family members and friends or residential detox. Relapse could turn your resolution into remorse or regret. But there are different approaches you can take to make a lifestyle change to sober living.

Recovery Types: The Differences Between Passive and Active Recovery

An essential thing to remember about recovery is that it is a process. There are two ways to recover from alcohol use and substance use disorders: passively and actively. Passive recovery involves abstinence from drugs or alcohol without treatment. In contrast, active recovery requires both abstinence and professional care. Between the passive and active ends of the recovery spectrum, exists variations in degree and many combinations of both extremes—depending on the individual in recovery. The choice between these two methods usually depends on the severity of the condition and the support system in place.

The Differences Between Drug Addiction and Obsession

Most people think of substance use as things like alcohol and drugs when it comes to addictions. When it comes to compulsions and obsessive behaviors, the first things that come to mind are gambling, hoarding and eating disorders.

The Stages of Addiction

Various stages of addiction manifest through different periods of a person's substance use. For some people, they can develop a substance-related habit quickly, within months, for example. Others may need to use substances for an extended period before progressing along the spectrum of disordered drug use, which could mean several years.

What Does It Mean to Practice Self-Care in Recovery?

Sobriety is just one aspect of recovery. A new life awaits you if you stop using drugs or alcohol. Self-care is at the heart of a significant transition.
We all require a tune-up when we become clean since drug abuse has ravaged our health. Drug and alcohol abuse is harmful to the body, mind, and soul. Those with substance use disorders who have been inactive in their recovery treatment for months or years must take the necessary steps to rehabilitate and preserve their health.

How Does Self-Acceptance Relate to Addiction Recovery?

Many people will tell you that recovery from drugs and alcohol begins with recognizing and accepting that your drinking or substance abuse is a problem. While it is an essential first step, authentic healing begins more profoundly with self-acceptance.

To accept oneself—flaws and all is what it means to be truly human. Many people who begin using drugs or develop problematic drinking behaviors do so from silent psychological prompts of low self-esteem and self-worth, which are directly linked to a lack of self-acceptance and self-love.

Is Self-Medicating with Drugs and Alcohol Like Addiction?

When people are going through difficult times, they often turn to substances to help them get through the day. They turn to alcohol, marijuana, prescription pills and other substances to help them manage their emotions and feelings. Some people may use home remedies or drugs and alcohol to help them sleep, be social or manage pain. But how is what they’re doing any different than what people diagnosed with addiction are doing? This article will look at other aspects of self-medicating and discuss whether it is the same as substance use disorder.

Five Things Not to Do or Say When Your Loved One Is in Rehab

Many people in recovery feel embarrassed or ashamed. Because of how others treat them, many people have problems talking about their drug use, which causes dread and prevents them from obtaining the care they genuinely need. This article will discuss five things to avoid when dealing with such a circumstance and how to communicate to your loved ones without making them feel worse or wanting to clam up and stop getting therapy.

Easing the Power of Trauma with EMDR

The effects of trauma can make recovery from substance use disorder a challenging thing. With EMDR, a person can heal suppressed memories and heal.

What is Nad+ Therapy: Infographic

NAD+ refers to Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide. Every cell in your body has it. It is a coenzyme of vitamin B-3 or niacin, making it a small molecule that helps activate enzymes by binding to protein molecules. Enzymes are necessary because they handle over 5,000 biochemical reactions within the body.

Keeping Your Job While Going to Rehab: How to Balance Career With Recovery

Addiction to drugs or alcohol can have a profound, negative effect on a person’s ability to live a healthy, fulfilling life. Its consequences impact every aspect of a person’s well-being, from their physical and mental health to their safety and ability to have healthy relationships.

Use Judgment Diffusion in Recovery to Let Go

We all play the role of a judge at some point. Opinions are another word for judgments, which may be excellent or negative. "That was the worst pizza I've ever eaten." "That cake seems to be laden with calories." Today has been a wonderful day to be outside.

 

Judgments about your self-destructive conduct are common among those with drug misuse or addiction issues. Addictions and substance abuse can hurt people's daily lives and interactions with others, so it's normal and natural that people be concerned. You'll simply make yourself feel worse if you judge yourself for being unable to quit or continue using despite the repercussions and the opinions of others.

What is NAD+ Therapy and How Can it Help Me During Detox?

NAD+ therapy is an IV treatment that is often used to combat the degenerative effects of aging, however, it is quickly gaining popularity as a treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. This trendy treatment is able to reduce withdrawal symptoms, alleviate drug cravings, boost energy levels, and improve mental clarity by healing your body at the cellular level.

Coping with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

Co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders (SUDs) may be burdensome. If you have this problem, you know how tough it is to live a regular life. The National Center for Drug Abuse Statistics reports that 165 million Americans, or 60.2% of the population over 12, currently abuse drugs, including alcohol and cigarettes. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, about 8 million people, or 17.5% of those with mental health difficulties, abuse drugs. This article will discuss dual diagnosis, signs, and how to manage both conditions.

Why are Bipolar Disorder and Substance Use often Mentioned Together?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, people who have bipolar disorder are twice as likely to struggle with substance use disorder (SUD). Bipolar disorder and substance use disorder intersect at many levels for various people. Since having bipolar can lead to or worsen SUD symptoms, many people view the two as related.

When a person has a diagnosis of substance use disorder with bipolar, they have co-occurring disorders or dual diagnosis. Even though the term "dual diagnosis" is singular, people with co-occurring conditions must get integrated treatment for each illness for improved life quality.

The Addiction Withdrawal Timeline

If you have substance use disorder or suffer from alcoholism but want to stop drinking or using drugs, you may have thought about stopping cold turkey. That’s when you abruptly stop using the substance you're addicted to. While it is commendable to want to quit drinking or using drugs, the problem with the cold turkey approach is that your body has grown accustomed to having the substance in your system, which means that your body may have started to develop a physical dependency.

Clear Mind Vs. Addiction Mind & Clean Mind

A clear mind is synthesized as the convergence point of a clean mind and an addiction mind. With a clear mind, you're sober, but you also recognize warnings and take precautions to avoid relapse.

 

To have a clean mind is to be sober and free from problematic addictive behavior for an extended time, yet to be utterly ignorant of the risks and desires associated with returning to it. Having a clean mind might make you feel like you can conquer your addiction and never give in to the urge to use substances or drink again. This is the fallacy of sobriety, in that there is the conviction that one is no longer affected by addiction.

Start Prioritizing Self-Care for Tremendous Success and Sustainability at any Stage of Your Addiction Recovery

Let’s face it: as human beings with feelings and vulnerabilities, none of us is impervious to pain and suffering. Research shows that people who have experienced traumatic events are more prone to addiction. However, what makes the difference between those who give up and those who continue fighting in their recovery is self-care. Let’s look at why self-care is critical to staying sober and being one step ahead of a possible relapse.

The Significance of Social Connections in Recovery

Alcohol and substance use disorders are chronic diseases that require continued care and support to prevent a relapse. Social connection is essential for recovery, but this is a challenging time for those with substance use disorders. The stigma around drug and alcohol issues is significant; people may feel shame about disclosing their condition or fear judgment from others.

Releasing the First in a New Series Exploring "Substance Use as an Emotional Response"

The spooks, ghosts, and goblins of Halloween are gone. As the collected assortment of candies starts to dwindle, the air of the season shifts to cooler, longer nights, and the turkey and tinsel of the holidays begin to appear everywhere. This can bring about stress and mental health conditions like seasonal affective disorder. Many people respond to emotional distress in many ways, from food to sex to drugs or alcohol.

When someone has experienced trauma or is in a negative situation, how they react to this will be different for everyone. Some people respond in ways that make matters worse for themselves and the parties involved, and some respond unhealthily, like drinking or misusing drugs.

The Impact of Primary and Secondary Emotions on Substance Abuse

Many people's decisions to experiment with drug or alcohol usage are heavily influenced by their feelings. Thoughts, emotions, and behaviors are all interconnected. As one changes, the other is impacted, and so on. A person's ideas and actions may become self-destructive when experiencing negative emotions like fear, anger, sadness, or isolation.